How a Peer Mentor Program Operates

An example of what would be required to set up a structured Peer Mentor Program involving older students (Peer Mentors) moving alongside younger students (mentees) in a group situation:

  • Peer Mentors would be selected from students in their final two years of High (Secondary) School. They would work in pairs and mentor a group of 6 to 10 students in their first year of High School. Composition of the groups will be decided by the Program Coordinator in consultation with teachers and School Management.
  • The Program Coordinator will give Peer Mentors support and advice, facilitate weekly meetings, distribute and collect extra resource material and be around during the Peer Mentor sessions. Alternatively, the Program Coordinator might coordinate a group of teachers who are given specific tasks to carry out.
  • The Program Coordinator will meet with Peer Mentors regularly to discuss progress of the Peer Mentor Program. These need not be lengthy meetings – simply a time for sharing thoughts and ideas about the program and staying pro-active if there are areas that need to be addressed.
  • Peer Mentors will work closely during the program with the Program Coordinator. Ongoing evaluation is important.
  • In addition, the Program Coordinator will meet with Peer Mentors on a weekly basis to ensure Peer Mentors are suitably prepared and have the necessary resources for each session.
  • Peer Mentor training workshops should be held before the Peer Mentor program begins. The school will decide a process for selecting the Peer Mentors.
  • Peer Mentors are being asked to make a commitment for a given period of time, which should not exceed one calendar year.
  • Peer Mentors and their student group will reflect a variety of cultures and will meet once a week at a specific venue in a timetabled period.
  • The 45-minute period should be timetabled as a Peer Mentor period within the curriculum.